Archive for January 5th, 2009

05
Jan
09

The Temple

 

     One of the most important aspects of Mormonism is the temple.  It often refers to the temples of Bible times and implies that the modern-day LDS temples are continuations of those biblical temples.  But there is nothing similar between the two.

     Consider first who could enter the temple.  In biblical times, only the priests could enter it.  And priesthood was determined by genetics.  Only the men from the house of Aaron could be priests.  In Mormonism, both priest holders and non-priest holders can enter the temple.  And LDS priesthood is not determined by genetics. 

     Even more striking was the fact that only one man, the high priest, could enter the inner part of the temple, the Holy of Holies.  And he could only do that on one day of the year, the Day of Atonement. 

     Another difference is their structure.  In the Bible, the temple consisted of only two rooms:  the Holy Place and the Holy of Holies.  There were no sealing rooms or celestial room as there are in LDS temples.

     Most striking is the difference in activities between the two.  Biblical temples revolved around sacrifice.  It sounded and smelled like a slaughter-house.  For example, when it was dedicated King Solomon sacrificed 22,000 cattle and 120,000 sheep and goats!  Each day afterward daily sacrifices both for the nation and for individuals were offered.  The book of Hebrews wonderfully explains all this as it talks about how these sacrifices and all that blood prefigured Jesus’ sacrifice for us.  The activity of biblical temples was one striking and repeating object lesson: “without shedding of blood is no remission.”  (Heb. 9:22)

     The activity within LDS temples is completely different.  In it people receive endowments for themselves and vicariously for the dead; are married for eternity and are vicariously married for the dead, and are baptized for the dead. There the emphasis is on how people can redeem the dead, one of the three main missions of the Mormon Church.  That is in striking contrast to how biblical temples pointed ahead to Jesus’ redeeming us by the shedding of his blood.

     Instead of connecting Mormonism to the Bible, LDS temples strikingly show the difference between the Bible and Mormonism.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     One of the most important aspects of Mormonism is the temple.  It often refers to the temples of Bible times and implies that the modern-day LDS temples are continuations of those biblical temples.  But there is nothing similar between the two.

     Consider first who could enter the temple.  In biblical times, only the priests could enter it.  And priesthood was determined by genetics.  Only the men from the house of Aaron could be priests.  In Mormonism, both priest holders and non-priest holders can enter the temple.  And LDS priesthood is not determined by genetics. 

     Even more striking was the fact that only one man, the high priest, could enter the inner part of the temple, the Holy of Holies.  And he could only do that on one day of the year, the Day of Atonement. 

     Another difference is their structure.  In the Bible, the temple consisted of only two rooms:  the Holy Place and the Holy of Holies.  There were no sealing rooms or celestial room as there are in LDS temples.

     Most striking is the difference in activities between the two.  Biblical temples revolved around sacrifice.  It sounded and smelled like a slaughter-house.  For example, when it was dedicated King Solomon sacrificed 22,000 cattle and 120,000 sheep and goats!  Each day afterward daily sacrifices both for the nation and for individuals were offered.  The book of Hebrews wonderfully explains all this as it talks about how these sacrifices and all that blood prefigured Jesus’ sacrifice for us.  The activity of biblical temples was one striking and repeating object lesson: “without shedding of blood is no remission.”  (Heb. 9:22)

     The activity within LDS temples is completely different.  In it people receive endowments for themselves and vicariously for the dead; are married for eternity and are vicariously married for the dead, and are baptized for the dead. There the emphasis is on how people can redeem the dead, one of the three main missions of the Mormon Church.  That is in striking contrast to how biblical temples pointed ahead to Jesus’ redeeming us by the shedding of his blood.

     Instead of connecting Mormonism to the Bible, LDS temples strikingly show the difference between the Bible and Mormonism.

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